MODO DE VOLAR

And He was asking him, "What is your name?" And he said to Him, "My name is Multitude; for we are many."

the Carnation Revolution [edit]

On this day, 42 years ago, a movement risen from within the portuguese Armed Forces marched towards the centres of power of the New State in Lisbon to put an end to colonial occupation, and to 48 years of dictatorship and authoritarian repression.

The military coup d’état became a national wide movement of civil resistance in a matter of hours.


 

One has to respect points two and three of…
leftwing agenda

 

On this day, 42 years ago, a movement risen from within the portuguese Armed Forces marched towards the centres of power of the New State in Lisbon to put an end to colonial occupation, and to 48 years of dictatorship and authoritarian repression.

The military coup d’état became a national wide movement of civil resistance in a matter of hours.

In the middle of the mob that invaded the streets in support of the coup and celebrating the fall of the regime, a florist hold a bunch of red carnations – at the time one of the cheapest flowers – and started distributing them by the military. The army men, the story goes, put the flowers into the muzzles of the rifles and on their uniforms. The date was named the Carnation Revolution.

 

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The ‘conquests of april’ gave us freedom of speech, parliamentary democracy, labor and union rights, the de-elitization of education, a state with strong social support, and one of the most radical (and now progressive) republican Constitutions of the world.

It was 1974. In four decades the date, as expected, became celebrated by both the left wing and a self proclaimed ‘center’ that had no pudency in following the conservative and neoliberal trends that swept the west. They took the conquests and demands of april as their own, while slowly suffocating then under the name of ‘progress’ and ‘innovation.’

 

 

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We have spent the last forty years defending that we once achieved, and to some extent we’ve fallen in the trap of those who set the narrative:

April was more than demands, achievements or conquests. April gave us a presence, a dissonant perception, and above all movement. Many of those who nowadays proclaim april are happy to agree with its objectives; they are, however, disgusted by what such movement would mean today: something radical, something radical, something which would refuse the ‘inevitability’ of the state of things.

In ’74 the brazilian musician Chico Buarque wrote Tanto Mar (So Much Sea), a song of solidarity from across the Atlantic, and the wish that the brazilian people would overcome their dictatorship as well. Today we are the ones extending our solidarity against a conservative overthrow of the government that compliments the main characters of the past dictatorship.

 

 

Four years later, Chico amended the lyrics. It was no longer just a celebration, but the recognition of the inversion of movement and a word of hope. ‘They have already wilted your joy, friend. But surely they forgot a seed in some little garden corner.’

April is not dead. So don’t spread nostalgia or witfulness. Contaminate with empowerment and insurrection. “74 is gone! Figth Now!”

 


April demonstrations two years ago.


 

[edit] via @TheGilHenriques

Little known fact: due to the #25deAbril Revolution (read my previous posts if you are unaware of it!), Portugal almost had its own Chile moment.
 
Our own Salvador Allende was the Prime Minister of the 2nd to 5th Provisional Governments, Vasco Gonçalves, who was in office during much of the period known as Ongoing Revolutionary Process (PREC). As a protagonist of the so-called Hot Summer of 1975, he oversaw the implementation of popular demands such as agrarian reform; nationalization of banks, insurance companies, public transit, steel work, and others; creation of minimum wage and unemployment benefits, literacy campaigns; acceleration of the decolonization process; and many other crowning achievements of the Revolution.
 
Much like Salvador Allende and the Popular Unity, Vasco Gonçalves’ governments were supported by popular mobilizations and used protest songs as campaign anthems. In the most famous of them (“Be strong, comrade Vasco!”), the lyrics read: “there are some that want to leave this country in the reach of monopolists, but the people don’t disarm and say we don’t want capitalists!” (See video below.)
 
The USA kept a close eye on the Ongoing Revolutionary Process. Afraid that Portugal would become “the Cuba of Europe”, they issued a Red Scare — the US American press printed titles such as “red threat in Portugal!” As the Revolutionary Process did not seem to slow down (two attempted reactionary coups d’état failed), the US started considering the “Chilean solution”.
 
With the successful 1973 imperialistic toppling of the democratically elected Chilean president, socialist Salvador Allende, still fresh in their memory, the US started to draw plans to invade Portugal and depose Gonçalves in a similar fashion. The last chief of Government of Francoist Spain, Arias, started negotiations with Kissinger in 1975 to plan a dual invasion. Because the North of Portugal was much less revolutionary than the South (e.g. in 1976, the North tried to stop supply to “Red Lisbon”), a plan was devised to divide the country into a capitalist North Portugal and a socialist South Portugal.
 
These plans became unnecessary — and Portugal ended up never having its own Chile moment — when, in the 25th of November 1975, the military forces close to the CIA-backed moderate Socialist Party put an end to the PREC, with the electoral support of the right wing and of the Catholic Church
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This entry was posted on 25/04/2016 by in Sem categoria.
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